The Criminal & College Discipline Blog

By Scott Limmer

An attorneys blog about criminal law and procedure, college discipline, Title IX and cases of Interest

New York Criminal Law Reforms Took Effect in January 2020

Major changes in New York’s criminal law, backed by Governor Cuomo and passed by the state legislature in 2019, took effect in 2020, and local and state governments are still debating how those changes will affect criminal law enforcers and defendants. Here’s a quick summary of changes the new law made as of January 1, […]

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Education Department Proposes New Rules for Title IX Cases

The Department of Education (DOE), in November of 2018, released its proposed new regulations spelling out how schools and universities should handle complaints of sexual harassment or assault.   If adopted, the new rules will replace much-criticized Obama administration guidelines in a “Dear Colleague” letter sent to schools in 2011, but never proposed for public comment. Again without notice and comment, […]

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States Weigh Actions on Life without Parole for Young Crimes

The landmark 2005 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Roper v. Simmons banned capital punishment for juveniles as unconstitutionally cruel and unusual. At the time, 12 states banned capital punishment in all cases, and 18 more prohibited it for juveniles, while 72 juveniles were on Death Row in 12 states. In 2010, the high court in Graham v. Florida further restricted juvenile sentencing, […]

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School Safety Report Urges Undoing Obama Discipline Guidance

The Federal Commission on School Safety, created after the mass shooting last February at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in which former student Nikolas Cruz killed 17 students and staff members, issued its report on December 18. Among the Commission’s nearly 100 recommendations was eliminating “guidance” statements made jointly by the Obama […]

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Appeals of Texas Murder Convictions Challenge Hypnotizing Witnesses

Hypnotizing Witnesses – Two Texas Death Row inmates seek to block their executions because their convictions relied in part on the testimony of a witness who had been hypnotized, which they attack as too unreliable to be accepted in court. Along with Richard Chiles, an alleged accomplice, Charles Don Flores was accused of murdering a […]

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What a Criminal Defense Attorney Tells His Children About….Plagiarism, Updated!!

I am reposting this article I wrote about plagiarism but I am adding an introduction to concentrate of one specific type.  It is considered plagiarism when students copy another’s material on an exam or on a take home exam. And now back to our regularly scheduled article…… Plagiarism has always been a critical topic for […]

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Florida Air Travelers’ Cash May Be Seized if They Smell Wrong

If your travel plans include flying out of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, you’d be well-advised to make sure your clothes don’t have a lingering odor of marijuana. That’s because the police there has a habit of screening departing airport passengers for that telltale aroma, and when they detect it, relieving those passengers of the cash they’re […]

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Widespread COVID-19 Threats Faced by Jails and Prisons Across the Country

As the global pandemic affects daily life worldwide, both national and state governments are trying to come to terms with COVID-19 threats and its effects of inmates and corrections staff in America’s jails and prisons. The Bureau of Prisons (BOP), which runs the 122 federal corrections facilities nationwide last year holding about 220,000 inmates, or […]

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High Court: Warrantless Blood Draw Okay if Driver Unconscious

The Fourth Amendment protects against unreasonable searches and seizures and has generally been interpreted to mean police need a warrant to test blood from a driver suspected of drunk driving. As recently as 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision (Birchfield v. North Dakota) ruled police had violated constitutional rights of a DUI […]

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High Court Weighs Life Sentence for Underage Washington Sniper

In an early case during its new term, on October 16 the U.S. Supreme Court heard an appeal by Lee Boyd Malvo of the sentence of life without possibility of parole Virginia gave him in 2004 for his role in a series of lethal sniping attacks in the nation’s capital region during the autumn of […]

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